5 Days To Go! Let’s Fund Crows on Heartstrings!

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WE’RE 85% FUNDED AND NEED ONE MORE PUSH TO GET FUNDED IN THE NEXT FIVE DAYS!

CLICK HERE TO PLEDGE!

We only have FIVE DAYS! We can do this with your help!

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Crows on Heartstrings is a fully illustrated anthology of short stories. We have a little something for everyone, no matter what your gender, sexuality, or color, we have something for you. We are proud to say that we are mostly created by, for and about lgbtqa+ folks. It’s nothing like you’ve ever seen before. We are also comprised of 23 women, and 3 men, so READ WOMEN!

The project is in its last FIVE DAYS on kickstarter and we need all of your support to bring our dream to life! please pledge if you can, and spread the word. thank you for everything, guys. we would not have made it this far without you!

 

Here are some of our contributors:

@aegisdea @aubreymeeksart @pannan-art @sonialiao @maxwickstrom @weatherfox @alisabishop @heavenlyeros @dodtt @spectre-draws @thevioletknight @shutterbones @artofpan

@theconstantvoice

What Crows on Heartstrings NEEDS:

We need FUNDING. We need your pledges to make this a reality. If you can pledge even just five dollars if you can, and tell five friends personally to pledge as well, we can do this! We want to give you the characters you want to read. Please help us make this inclusive book written and illustrated by 23 women, and 3 men, some or most of us LGBT+ writers and artists.  Come on! We can do it!

CLICK HERE TO PLEDGE!

We only have FIVE DAYS! We can do this with your help!

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Crows on Heartstrings: Only 9 Days Left on Kickstarter!

Check out Sneak Peeks of all the story illustrations from Crows on Heartstrings!

Please click here to back us on Kickstarter!

Sneak Peek #3: A Bullet for Death’s Rifle by Emily Duncan, illustrated by Sonia Liao

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Death is a girl named Caterina Kazakova. She harvests souls with her sniper rifle and watches as war tears through her country, as it always has and always will. When Caterina falls in love with a soldier in the warlord’s army, she knows what they have will be a short and bitter thing. A girl who is Death cannot love; a boy who is a soldier in this war is fated to die.

She collected the tethers like strings tied to her fingers, some black, some red, some in colors that Caterina had no name for. There were many, the aftermath of this battle was grim. A shot. A tether tied to her index finger. Another shot. A string tied to her wrist. She did not discriminate, she tied strings from both sides around and around until her own gloves had disappeared underneath the weight of the souls and their stories.

But it was dangerous to listen. It was dangerous to bend an ear and allow the soul their final words. If one spoke, the rest would hear and demand their turn. Too many tethers, too many strings, too many souls to ever hear their woes and their unfulfilled dreams. Better to set them free.

– Except from A Bullet for Death’s Rifle from @glitzandshadows , art by@sonialiao

Please help us spread the word! If you’ve pledged and want to see us funded, please share our kickstarter link across social media!

Click here to pledge!

Thank you for your support!

Crows on Heartstrings Sneak Peek #2 “Witch Child” by Lane Hansen, illustrated by Drei San Juan

 

Myrna is one of the witch children, said to be cursed by the sky demons with horrific powers. She’s capable of walking in the lightning storms that ravage her desert home and can speak with the mythic sand lions, but otherwise she has none of the powers witch children are said to have. She is hated and cursed by her village and blamed for any wrong that happens.

Her only friend is a strange boy named Jem, born during the same storm season as Myrna but not cursed with her powers to walk in the lightning.

When they are fourteen raiders come to their village and Jem is fatally wounded in the attack. Desperate, Myrna takes him to the sand lions for help.

Myrna did not remember the first time she stepped out into a lightning storm.

She did not remember how she got her scars; one at the base of her throat and the other on the bottom of her left foot. Sometimes it upset her to not remember feeling the lightning coursing through her body for the first time. Then again, the lightning was so much a part of her life that it was strange to imagine she had ever not known it.

She had been born during the season of sun, when normally the lightning storms were few and far between. Her parents thought they were safe. But the night her mother went into labor a storm tore across the bleeding land. She had tried to ignore the pain, as though that would stop the contractions, and begged Myrna to stay put a little while longer.

By morning the lightning was still razing the earth and Myrna was desperate to see.

Myrna never asked why her parents didn’t murder her, as the midwife had tried, as her grandmother had begged. She only knew that it was not love that had stayed their hand.

-Excerpt from “Witch Child” by Lane Hansen, illustrated by Drei San Juan

Like what you just read? Back us on Kickstarter by clicking here!

LGBT and Female Characters — How Crows on Heartstrings Wants Self Publishing To Change Everything

What is the difference between a female character and a male character in mainstream publishing? Well — that’s easy. The answer should be nothing.

It should be that male and female characters are both treated equally, but it doesn’t happen that way. Male characters are flawed but likeable. They struggle and are strong. Male characters are people. So what about female characters? It seems that today female characters are talked about in one of two ways, they are either the strong female lead or are a Mary Sue. 

The trend now in female characters is that they need to be strong in all aspects, fierce, undeniably unbeatable. Why can’t we see female characters the way we see male characters? Flawed and strong? Why are female characters so extreme? What happened to real women? Are we not interesting enough to make real characters?

But, tip the scale in either direction, and critics will tell you your female lead is obviously inspired by the author and therefore a Mary Sue, OR has no flaws to be seen and is too good at everything, and therefore, a Mary Sue.

What about characters of racial minority? Or LGBT Characters? What happens then?

Well, we simply do not have enough of those.

Why is it so hard to get good female characters, POC characters, and LGBT characters in stories? Does mainstream publishing not think they will sell? If that’s so, then we need to look to self publishers such as Natalia Jaster and J.C. Lillis for help.

Self publishing isn’t the same as it used to be. Sure, you can get some pretty sketchy e-books. A lot of them seem to be just first drafts of novels. But what we need to start doing, is to use self publishing, and fund self publishers, so that main stream publishers know what we want.

Diversity.

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If you agree with me up until this point, I have to share something with you. Crows on Heartstrings is a book of illustrated short stories, all centered around doomed love.

Our writers craft harrowing tales of families torn apart by entities unknown, lovers cursed by fairies, siblings fighting monsters, and more. No type of love is safe from our tragedies. Gay, straight, romantic, familial, friendly, no matter what your shape or color, we have something for you and we are coming for you. We also take our anti-discriminatory viewpoint and stretch it across genres. We have fantasy, sci-fi, supernatural, period, and contemporary pieces.

These aren’t just romances, they’re epic tales of doom. I can’t wait to steal your heart and shatter it a little!

And as if that isn’t enough, we have haunting imagery from only the most talented artists, just to twist the knife. Did you think we were done? Because we even have comics and poems, all doomed.

But it’s better to love and to have lost, isn’t it?

Crows on Heartstrings aims to treat it’s characters as the real, flawed, gritty characters we want.

Our gay characters do more than come out and suffer for it. Our women save the day in the real and complex ways that men do, and our POC characters do not die to enhance the arc of white male leads.

Crows on Heartstrings wants to show the world that stories can be marketable AND diverse.

We need to take what we want.

We need to create a demand for diversity in our books.

We need to write and appreciate characters who thrive or struggle in their own stories without depending on a cisgendered white male lead.

LGBT, Female, and POC characters are NOT plot devices. If you want to see all these things and more in your books and media, you must support small, self publishers where they offer it.

To learn more about Crows on Heartstrings and how you can help, pledge to our Kickstarter !

(article originally published on medium.com)

Crows on Heartstrings TEASER! Roses Grow for Mammet Men by Aubrey Meeks

What is it about?!

Elves and Faeries walk among humans in this urban fantasy set in New York City. The young, Elven clan leader, Daði Manfredsson, and Fae Prince, Mercurie Nightray have bigger things to worry about than integrating into human society.

But politics and love don’t mix, and soon, the two boys are slinging curses to sacrifice their love for control of the Hudson river trade routes.

Do the boys know love at all?

Can they work through true love and balance duty and desire? Or is it really as doomed as Crows on Heartstrings promises?

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“So, on this clear summer day, the tourists caught tall Dathi the elf in their pictures of the New York City Skyline and the Statue. It was like they’d never seen an elf before. Then again, Dath reminded himself, most people on this side of the ferry, the wrong side of the ferry, came from places like, the midwest, or the south, where Elves were still a bit of a myth.

He took the photo anyway. He put on a nice face for her to show her friends at book club. He smoothed his cornsilk plaits and his Rolling Stones t-shirt so whoever saw the image on her Facebook page thought something like, hey, that guy looks alright. Instead of whatever prejudiced bullshit they might say otherwise.

If Mercurie were here now. Dath chuckled to himself. If his boyfriend, my man, were there, the tourists might’ve gone home with slightly pornographic pictures of my Fairy boy and an Elf boy making out–And then they’d both be arrested for being a public nuisance. New Yorkers are liberal, but they’re not that liberal. Elves and Fae were still sort of taboo.”

-Excerpt from Roses Grow for Mammet Men by Aubrey Meeks

If you’re interested in Crows on Heartstrings, check out our kickstarter by clicking here!

(art by Ashley Feemster)

Book Review: Lady Midnight – Cassandra Clare

Let me preface this by saying I am a fan of Cassandra Clare and though this review is harsh, I respect her as a writer and will continue to read and buy her work.


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Lady Midnight, for me, was a war over Quality vs Quantity. Did we get a 600+ page book? Sure we did. Though as an aspiring writer, I cringed over the unclear plots and redundant description of clothes.

When I first started reading, I gave Cassandra Clare the benefit of the doubt because she had to reintroduce us to the world for the new series without a Clary or a Tessa, who were learning the world with us. But what ended up happening was anytime we learned something new, I felt like it was info-dumping. The narrator took us aside and dumped a Shadowhunter Textbook on our heads and then resumed the story.

The next worrying bit for me, was how much description of appearance there was. How many words are there for the Blackthorn verdigris eyes? I feel like Lady Midnight maybe should have been called Emma and Julian’s closet. I think I know every article of clothing they own.

I have a few bits I want answered but am hopeful will be answered later and are no just abandoned plot lines, like Julian’s sea-glass bracelet everyone stopped talking about halfway through the book.

I did like seeing cameos from the Shadowhunter Alums, but sometimes it just felt like a crutch. The climax of the story dragged on a bit too long and the resolution seemed redundant, mostly because the Alums came back.

We could talk about Emma going Will Herondale on Julian (spoiler, if you know what this means for love) And how at first I just thought Emma and Julian seemed like genderswapped Jace and Clary. (They grew into their own and became their own characters but it took a while for me to connect to them)
We could also talk about Mark being in the middle of an overlapping love triangle. (Though I don’t feel the bond between Cristina and Mark wasn’t enough to hold up an angle of a love triangle.
The betrayal seemed regurgitated…so many things seemed like a stitching of her own novels until they looked like a new one.

But let’s instead talk about what was great: Mark Blackthorn is a sly fox and he’s wonderful.
The forbidden love between Julian and Emma is so hot.
Necromancy!
Honestly, the major plot of the story, the introduction to Faerie was all great and creative and fresh. (though I hated the shadow market and how getting there was exactly like Diagon Alley)

I am excited about the return of Jem and Tessa.

And Kieran’s love story, my goodness. That boy is a tragic gem!

So overall, I liked the story, I don’t mind the love triangles, I just wish the writing was tighter and more precise. Also, Cassie, stop telling me about their clothes every five seconds!

But I’m still going to read the rest of her books and buy everything Cassandra Jean illustrates because I do love the world Cassie Clare creates.

Book Review: Radio Silence – Alice Oseman

25322449I need to tell you first and foremost how much I adored this book. Alice Oseman is a goddess. Solitaire was gorgeous, and her second book, Radio Silence is even better.

So what do you need from a good book? Juicy Romance? Strong Female leads who never miss a beat? Is that what you really need? Because you won’t find it here and I promise you, this book gave me more ‘feels’ than anything I’ve read this year.

I definitely commend Alice Oseman for keeping her cast of characters diverse in sexuality, gender, and ethnicity. That’s just normal, isn’t it? Alice Oseman has a way with making the ordinary extraordinary, doesn’t she? And she doesn’t have to whitewash her characters to do it. Alice showed her mostly non white, entirely LGBTQIA+ characters as normal people, being normal– And guess what? That’s because everyone is normal regardless of these labels, and everyone can carry a novel if the character is fleshed out enough. And no, (for you more conservative readers) it doesn’t mean anyone is shoving an agenda down your throat.

So let’s move on then: Moral of the first section, Alice is inclusive of all people in this book.

Aled Last. I love Aled. He is a sweet and snuggly boy (Alice has said he doesn’t necessarily label himself according to gender, though he was born a boy)  I don’t love him because he needs saving, or because he is in love with the female protagonist, because arguably, neither is true. I love him because he is Aled, and he is remarkable. It is so easy to feel a connection to Aled, … and all the characters for that matter.

But what about the strong female lead? Well. Frances is strong, and female. But the trope we’re all tired of is that women have to be infallible to be strong. I love Alice Oseman because she keeps writing incredibly complex women, even in her minor characters, and you cannot tell me they’re not strong women. They’re real women, girls, people going through things, and she treats her beautifully flawed women the same way we treat cis white male characters… and you know what? I love them, I love her characters. It’s what makes everything so profound and resounding about her plots. Her women aren’t assassins or damsels, they’re just girls, which is what we need.

There had to be one thing right? It’s spoilery. So stop reading if you want to read this book.

Aled is in a complicated relationship with Daniel/Dae Sung. And the realness is a little bit too uncomfortable here because I worry about Daniel influencing Aled to dress in ways he wouldn’t normally do himself. I wondered if Daniel was a little too controlling, though, again, they seem to be in a real relationship with real everyday problems, and I’m hoping it’s something they can eventually get over.

Anyway, please read this book. I give it all my approval. Alice Oseman is doing what we all should be doing, writing real characters who are inclusive of all ethnicities, gender, and sexuality without stereotyping, or defining anyone by one trait.

 

 

Crows on Heartstrings Anti Valentine’s Day Cards!

 

Ready to read these gut-wrenching stories? Visit the Crows on Heartstrings website!

Crows on Heartstrings – Cover Reveal!

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As most of you know, I am curating a book of short stories called Crows on Heartstrings. Well, our collection of short stories officially has a cover!

We are so proud to share with you our official book cover, designed by our own artist, Heavenlyeros!

Check out more on our brand new website crowsonheartstrings.com !